Unite the Fight (against Hate)

Earlier this evening, more than two hundred people gathered at the Allison-Parris County Office Building in New City to speak out against the rise in hateful action and rhetoric. After the terror of Neo-Nazi white supremacists spewing anti-Semitic, racist and xenophobic speech in Charlottesville, VA, Rockland Pride Center joined forces with the Jewish and African American communities to stand up for acceptance and understanding. You can read more on Facebook and watch a video of the rally at Unite the Fight, #UnitethefightRockland.

 

I share with you here, in part, my words in the hope that it will motivate all of us to take action in some large or small way, every day.

When I was a kid of twelve or thirteen, some of my friends got into a big fight, choosing up sides and being mean to each other. I remember growing so tired of the whole situation and complaining to my dad, “I just don’t want to deal with it anymore!”

My dad answered, “Tough. You have to deal with it… because they are your friends and they matter.”

I’ve gotten a little bit older since then, and my circle of concern has gotten a bit broader. Today, not just my friends and family matter. All people, because we are all created in God’s image, matter. But some days, I really want to say, “I just don’t want to deal with it anymore!”

That’s when I hear my dad’s voice reminding me: You have to deal with it, because people matter.

We have gathered on an auspicious day, the first day of the new month of Elul, when Jewish people look forward to the New Year and attempt to return to our best selves in a process called teshuva, repentance. We cannot do it all at once. But each of us can effect change one degree at a time.

This hopeful thought can allow us to say, “If we are able to change ourselves by one degree, then all of us together can change the direction of our country with that same one degree of change.

Consider the fact that we all showed up here in New City today. Instead of turning on our neighbors, instead of finding differences, we are committed to identifying all that brings us together.

We have gathered for freedom, democracy, and our trust in justice. This week in the Torah portion we read:‏ ‏צדק צדק תרדוף

Justice, justice you shall pursue. The way that we pursue justice now is by rallying together and uniting the fight.

When Brooke Malloy, Executive Director of the Rockland Pride Center, asked me to speak tonight, she suggested that I share how the Jewish community is feeling now after the events of Charlottesville a week and a half ago. I can’t speak for the Jewish community as a whole, but I can tell you how I am feeling. My response is encapsulated in the story of the president of the Charlottesville synagogue who stood on the front porch with two hired guards while white supremacists and neo-Nazis walked by shouting, “There’s the synagogue. Let’s burn it down!” and “Jews will not replace us!” As a congregational rabbi, nothing steals my breath as much as the fact that fifty people inside, finishing their Shabbat morning prayers, were told to sneak out the back door of their synagogue for their safety. In the United States of America.

As I thought about what Brooke asked me to do here, however, I realized that sharing my story is only the beginning. My work against hate must continue by asking questions instead of telling. What does this violence and hatred mean to you as a gay person? As an African-American? an Hispanic or Asian or a person who came from Haiti or Dominican Republic?

Our task is to prove that love truly is stronger than hatred despite the evidence of the past weeks. Love arises from knowing the other. Rabbi Jonathan Sacks has written: “The test of faith is whether I can make space for difference. Can I recognize God’s image in someone who is not in my image, whose language, faith, ideal, are different from mine? If I cannot, then I have made God in my image instead of allowing God to remake me in His.”

Let me return to the idea of one degree of change. As Rabbi Scheff taught in his sermon this past Shabbat, we could create change if all of us dedicate ourselves to get to know one new person every day, a person we do not know, a person who might look different from us. Try looking someone in the eyes who is in your office or in your class or at the store where you shop… someone you have never spoken with before. Say hello. Tell them who you are. Ask them who they are. And let us change the world together one degree at a time.

Because love is stronger than hate.

With prayers for peace, Rabbi Paula Mack Drill Speakers

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4 responses to “Unite the Fight (against Hate)”

  1. Barbara levinson says :

    I wish I could have participated but I am just out of the hospital I was there in spirit

  2. Philip Grossman says :

    How can I add this to my facebook page?

    On Wed, Aug 23, 2017 at 7:57 PM, Two Rabbis, One Voice, Three Opinions wrote:

    > Rabbi Paula Mack Drill posted: ” Earlier this evening, more than two > hundred people gathered at the Allison-Parris County Office Building in New > City to speak out against the rise in hateful action and rhetoric. After > the terror of Neo-Nazi white supremacists spewing anti-Semitic, raci” >

  3. Joel S Strauss says :

    I noticed that hardly people speak of hatred toward those with Disabilities and the Deaf people. I am sadden by this fact. I am sure that the Neo-Nazis would love to terminate us all.

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