Deep Listening

Join me now to consider four possible levels of conversation: Conform, Confront, Connect, and Co-Create as taught by Dr. Otto Scharmer, Senior Lecturer at MIT and co-founder of the Presencing Institute. https://www.presencing.com/

This past week, I spent two days continuing my work of visioning a new identity for the Rabbinical Assembly, the professional organization of Conservative Rabbis worldwide. We were challenged by Liz Alperin Solms and Marie McCormick, our change project facilitators, www.insytepartners.com, to understand and experience deep levels of productive conversation.

Our work over the past year has been anchored in a passion to re-envision a new path for the RA, ensuring a vital and vibrant future for Conservative Judaism.

Over the past year, I have been part of this exciting Vision Team of fifty rabbis representing a variety of years of experience and professional paths.

Throughout the work, I have been sensitive to the fact that the change work we are doing for the RA is translatable to our OJC community. I share with you now the ideas of deep conversations so that we can apply them to our synagogue life.

At the first level of conversation, Conforming, we talk “nice,” speaking to try and provide what the other person wants to hear. We use polite routines and empty phrases to conform to expectation. “Yes, of course, what you care about is important to me.” “No, of course, I don’t think that you are being difficult – I am glad to hear your thoughts.” “Sure, that’s just fine with me.”

Next, Confronting. We talk tough. We speak from an unshakable position of our own beliefs and understandings. Because we are our point of view, we become defensive. In these conversations, I am right and therefore you are not.

At the third level, Connecting, our conversations are reflective inquiries. Now I speak from a place where I see myself as part of the whole. I might still think differently from you, but now I want to know why. Rather than defend my position, I want to connect with you and come to understand your viewpoint. “I may not agree but I hope that you will tell me more about that.” “I have never thought about the issue in that way before.”

Finally, Co-Create is the fourth level. At this deep level of experience, conversation is a generative flow. I understand my place as being part of a collective, I practice stillness and experience the flow. This final level of conversation leads to collective creativity. In co-creating conversations, we might feel that something extraordinary has entered the space.

When I learned about collective creativity, I suddenly saw that our Rabbis of Tradition understood generative flow. Talmud teaches that when two people sit together to study Torah, the Shekhina, the nurturing aspect of God, rests upon their shoulders. The students of Torah lose their sense of separateness in the connection through Torah.

Our project facilitators explained that most conversations in our lives happen at one of the first two levels, and indeed, both are necessary to live successfully in the world. Sometimes we have to just be polite. Sometimes we just have to say what we really think and stand by it.

Shifts

But if we want something to change and grow, we must dig deeper in our conversations. If we want our synagogue to prosper and thrive in adaptive and exciting ways, we must practice conversations at the third or even fourth level.

Scharmer’s theory about conversations for change feels very Jewish to me. To succeed as a community, we must let go of the inclination to begin every conversation from our own point of view. For success, we must say: I am part of something bigger than myself: this synagogue, this history, this particular people, this covenant with God. To fully participate in such a collective endeavor, I must listen carefully for clues about what you think and remain open to the possibility that my thinking is not enough. Together, we are stronger, wiser and more creative.

I look forward to continuing the conversation,

Rabbi Paula Mack Drill

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5 responses to “Deep Listening”

  1. Eileen Lavin Rogers says :

    Looking forward to more deep listening experiences

  2. Danny Horwitz says :

    As rabbis, I think there has been a lot of deep listening over the years…which often has led to groups leaving the RA.
    My first RA convention was in 1983, and included a very powerful and extremely respectful dialogue between those who supported admitting women as members and those who were opposed. In the end, most of those opposed left the RA. I wasn’t around for most of the brouhaha with the Reconstructionists, so I don’t know if that was quite on the same level. What I have read in some of the back issues of CJ was similar. But the result was the same, at least for many.
    It would not shock me to find that we will have more of the same. We can be good and caring listeners for each other, but still find that our principles are so far apart that we cannot succeed as a community.

  3. annette diskin says :

    Your teaching, as always, has me thinking. Interesting to try deeper thinking in every day life.

  4. Ed says :

    Connecting at a deeper level (3rd modality) sounds like Theodore Reich’s injunction to listen with what he called “a third ear”. That’s always advisable
    in our roles as rabbis who must do more than co-opt others.

  5. Ruth Hess says :

    You are so wonderful!

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