Tag Archive | Mindfulness

Carmel Louis, Teacher of Mindfulness

On October 14th at 8:45 am, my watch battery died. The date is significant because it is the morning when we finally left two weeks of quarantine in Tel Aviv and held our new grandson in our arms for the first time.

As I write these words, I am sitting on my return flight home. Recollecting two magical weeks with Sagi, Sarah and newborn Carmel Louis, I can see now the significance of lacking a functioning watch. 

What time was it? It was the present moment in every moment.

I have tried to be intentional for many years, studying and practicing mindfulness, even having the chutzpah to teach it. But for the first time, I experienced complete presence without working at it.

Carmel Louis was my teacher.

What time was it? Without my watch and with my phone tucked away, it was just this moment. 

It was time for Carmel to cuddle in my arms, listening to me sing “White Cliffs of Dover.”

It was time for Sagi and Sarah to give Carmel a bath. (He screamed throughout!)

It was time to bless Carmel for Shabbat.

It was time to push Carmel’s stroller to the tayelet (the walkway beside the Mediterranean) to see the sunset.

It was time to take three chicken pot pies out of the oven, one for dinner, one for Josh, and one for the freezer. 

It was time to sit on the balcony beside Sagi’s herb garden as Sarah nursed Carmel.

It was time to stare endlessly at Carmel Louis Fainshtain Drill, mesmerized by every expression that passed across his tiny face.

Before I post these words, I will have returned home, turned off my away message, and begun responding to my emails. I am grateful for the lessons taught by Carmel and I will maintain them as I reenter the hectic pace of rabbinic work during a pandemic. 

I hope that the lessons I learned will not only stay with me, but be helpful to you as well.

  1. Do one thing at a time. Multi-tasking means that you’re going to miss something.
  2. Practice doing nothing at all except for gazing at something perfect and beautiful in God’s world. If you don’t have Carmel handy, practice with the view from your window, your pet, or a loved one on Zoom.
  3. Be completely aware of your blessings in every moment. If you feel down or fatigued or worried (as we are apt to feel in these days), reframe the moment. Despite your experience at the time, look for and count your blessings. (Sarah described feeling so tired when she heard Carmel cry just one-half hour after a middle of the night feeding. Then she looked into his little face and was flooded with love.)
  4. Put your phone down and take off your watch. I know that I cannot do this in my normal days as I did for two weeks on Mapu Street in Tel Aviv. But I can do it for an hour every day. And I can do it on Shabbat.

Let me know how you do! Drop me a note anytime! What time? The present moment in every moment will be just the right time!

With blessings, Rabbi Paula Mack Drill

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