House and Home

Mah tovu–How beautiful are your tents, O Jacob, your dwelling places, O Israel” (Numbers 24:5, from this week’s parasha, Balak).


The Bible’s poetry often appears as a parallelism, where elements of a sentence are identical in construction and meaning. On a first reading, we might understand the quote above, spoken by the prophet Balaam, as an example of this technique. Traditional rabbinic commentaries, however, attempt to show that this verse is more than simple repetition of an idea for the sake of poetry, that “Jacob” and “Israel” are not parallels, that “tents” and “dwelling places” carry different connotations.

According to the Sefat Emet, a nineteenth century Hasidic commentary by Rabbi Yehudah Leib Alter of Ger, “Jacob” is the Jew who wanders (in tents) outside the Land of Israel (in Poland, in his case); “Israel” is the Jewish People in the Land, connected to the home of the Temple (the dwelling place). “Beauty” (or holiness), he argues, attaches to both.

We can also draw a distinction in the blessing between the temporary (tents) and the permanent (dwelling place), the fleeting and the fixed. Whether we are on the move or settled at home, out in public or in the privacy of our space, we have the ability to evoke a sense of holiness by virtue of the ways in which we interact with the people and the world around us.


One more distinction that I derive from this blessing, which we are meant to recite every time we enter a place of prayer, is that between body and soul.

For me, the tent represents the physical and tangible things with which we surround ourselves–our homes, our clothing, our financial resources–even as we struggle like Jacob to discover our true identities. These things may be impermanent, but they are necessary, and they can be put to use in a way that garners appreciation and evokes a sense of holiness.

The dwelling place, in contrast, is where the soul resides. It represents the intangibles of our lives–our values, character traits and relationships–that lie at the heart of what it means to be connected with one another as the People of Israel. These things are always part of us, no matter where we find ourselves, no matter where we wander. We welcome beauty and holiness into our lives when we learn to access this dwelling place, this internal sanctuary.

Can we live in two places at once? Can we create for ourselves both a house and a home? Can we open to others both our doors and our hearts? When we are finally able to do so, no matter where we find ourselves in life or in the world, we will find the blessing of God’s presence.

Rabbi Craig Scheff

5 responses to “House and Home”

  1. Rhonda Plawner says :

    Yasher Koach. Beautiful words to lead us into Shabbat.

  2. Charles Yassky says :

    Words to ponder and embrace. Shabbat Shalom to you, Rabbi.

  3. Ruth and Karl Hess says :

    Your words are so beautiful both to read and to embrace.
    Shabbat Shalom to you and your family.
    Love,
    Ruth and Karl

  4. Amy D Schwartz says :

    Beautiful and heartfelt words to bring in Shabbat.

  5. Joel Scott (Yitzchak) Strauss says :

    The statement “the dwelling place, in contrast, is where the soul resides” is the most profound spiritual statement. It is beyond any physical realm and without barriers. All souls belong to both HaShem and the Deeper Cosmos we cannot see or comprehend.

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